Monitoring and evaluation

We work to maximise the social and economic impact of development efforts. As a trusted provider of monitoring and evaluation services we combine our deeply rooted understanding of the African context with our extensive experience in qualitative and quantitative monitoring and evaluation (M&E) methods to assess progress and measure value creation. 

Our Evaluation for Development practice provides African governments, companies, international donors, foundations and non-profits with the information and insight they need to improve their interventions and produce better results, ultimately achieving greater impact on economies and people’s lives.

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Expertise Areas

Design, review and support of M&E systems

We provide monitoring and evaluation technical assistance and capacity development to programmes and their staff members. In doing so, we adopt a results-based management approach, which ensures that M&E processes are embedded in programme implementation and decision-making. This ensures that emerging lessons can immediately be fed back to programme decision-makers, who can make adjustments that improve the programme’s ultimate value and impact.

When providing technical assistance, our role varies from being the M&E officer on short- or long-term programmes, to assisting and mentoring internal M&E staff, to conducting workshops and training sessions, and to developing M&E frameworks and tools for implementation.

We have worked with Adam Smith International, Access to Finance Rwanda, Helmsley Charitable Trust, TechnoServe, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Corruption Watch South Africa, Financial Sector Deepening Kenya, the South African Financial Services Board (FSB) and the South African National Treasury’s Jobs Fund on developing their M&E systems and frameworks. 

Evaluation & impact assessment

Evaluations can be conducted at any point in an intervention’s life cycle. They are used to diagnose and analyse constraints, understand the appropriateness of an intervention’s design, estimate and validate the value an intervention has delivered, and uncover ways in which current roll out or future scale-up or replication can be improved so as to maximise impact.

We are committed to making our evaluations as useful as possible for funders, implementers and service providers. We are well versed in refining key questions to be answered by evaluations and generating those answers through multiple data collection methods, always upholding the highest ethical standards and rigour while doing so.

Some of our evaluation clients include DFID, the MasterCard Foundation, the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation in the South African Presidency (DPME), the IFC, AFD, the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA), Habitat for Humanity and CARE International. 

Ongoing support as a learning partner

Beyond assisting our clients to validate and improve their own impact, there are important lessons to be learnt that can be shared with other funders and practitioners and applied to their own interventions. This facilitates a collective movement towards improvement and the realisation of greater value for more people.

We partner with our clients to provide ongoing learning support by developing collaborative, dynamic learning frameworks that facilitate learning and knowledge sharing with key audiences.

Market systems development

Undertaking practical and useful results measurement for programmes applying a market systems development approach is complex and requires one to think outside of the traditional linear approach to achieving impact.  

We combine our understanding of market systems, catalytic funding mechanisms and experience in private sector development with deep knowledge and expertise in international M&E standards, including the Donor Committee for Enterprise Development Standard.

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Financial inclusion

Hundreds of millions of people across sub-Saharan Africa lack access to basic financial products and services, including savings, credit and insurance. Lack of access to financial services is particularly acute among the poor, among women and among those living in rural areas where the reach of traditional financial channels has historically been limited.

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Projects

Evaluation of Microcred’s plan to bank a million new customers

Project name:
Genesis evaluates Microcred’s Mass Market Financial Inclusion project

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion
Digital

Sector:
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
Microcred (now Baobab)

Date:
2017 - 2018

Country:
Cote d'Ivoire
Madagascar
Senegal


Microcred (now Baobab) is a leading digital financial inclusion group focusing on serving individuals, micro and small businesses in Africa and China. 

Microcred was awarded a $12-million grant by the Mastercard Foundation in 2015 to roll out its Mass Market Financial Inclusion (MMFI) project, which aims to provide access to key financial services for the unbanked populations of Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire and Madagascar (375 000 clients in each country). 

MMFI's objectives include:

• understanding clients' needs, demands and challenges; 

• developing and implementing customer-centric products and channels; and 

• building capacity of staff and agents.

Genesis Analytics was contracted to conduct an evaluation of the MMFI project. This involved two components: 

1. A baseline diagnostic review of the context in which the project activities take place. The baseline evaluation provided insight into the prevailing institutions/competitors in the market, regulatory framework and customer demand dynamics, as well as the relevance of the MMFI project activities. 

2. A mid-term evaluation that served to ascertain MMFI’s level of progress vis-à-vis its objectives in Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire and Madagascar and generated key learnings to inform the remainder of the project, as well as the Mastercard Foundation’s learning framework.

The evaluation was completed in February 2018 and included an in-depth desktop review, key informant interviews with Microcred staff at head office and subsidiary levels, a survey with 806 clients (leveraging Microcred’s call centres) and focus group discussions with clients in Senegal and Madagascar.

Genesis evaluates government's evaluation system

Project name:
Evaluation of the National Evaluation System

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation

Sector:
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
Design, review and support of M&E systems

Client:
South Africa’s Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME)

Date:
2016 - 2018

Country:
South Africa


Genesis, in partnership with UK-based IOD PARC, was appointed by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) in the Office of the Presidency to evaluate South Africa’s National Evaluation System.

The National Evaluation System creates the framework within which policy, project or programme-level evaluations across national departments and provinces are selected, designed, commissioned and used. The National Evaluation System’s core function is to shape the evaluation agenda for South Africa and it is a key mechanism for good governance, public accountability and service delivery through its focus on enhancing evidence-based decision-making in the public sector.

The purpose of this evaluation was to assess whether the implementation of the NES was having an impact on the programmes and policies evaluated, the departments involved, and other key stakeholders; and to determine how the system needed to be strengthened to maximise its impact and value for money across government. 

The evaluation made use of a theory-based approach as a departure point, including document analysis; literature review and international benchmarking; stakeholder mapping; case studies; key informant interviews; and a survey. 

Departments and provinces were selected as case studies to represent a range of levels of engagement within the NES. Departmental case studies included the departments of Basic Education (DBE), Human Settlements (DHS), Justice and Constitutional Development (DJCD), Social Development (DSD), and Trade and Industry (the dti). The provincial case studies consisted of the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, Limpopo and the Western Cape.

Based on the evaluation, Genesis made recommendations to the DPME related to evaluation mandate, budgeting for evaluative processes, capacity development, managing and tracking evaluations, and strengthening use through communication and improvement plans. 

Genesis’s recommendations formed part of draft legislation on evaluation.

Final evaluation of YouthSave Initiative

Project name:
Final evaluation of the YouthSave Initiative

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Financial Services Strategy
Education
Public and Social
Youth economic opportunities

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
The MasterCard Foundation

Date:
2014 - 2015

Country:
Canada
Colombia
Ghana
Kenya
Nepal


The YouthSave initiative was a five-year youth savings and financial education programme aimed at 12 to 18-year-olds in Canada, Colombia, Ghana, Kenya and Nepal. It was implemented by a consortium of four partner organisations (Save the Children, CGAP, New America and the Centre for Social Development and Washington University in St Louis) through partnerships with commercial banks and research institutions in each country. 

YouthSave had a substantial research, learning and advocacy agenda that was intended to inform youth-based savings products and policies in and beyond its target countries.YouthSave was one of the first long-term programmes that had been funded by the foundation. 

Genesis was contracted by the MasterCard Foundation to conduct a final evaluation of the YouthSave initiative. The purpose of the evaluation was to document the achievements of the initiative, highlight the lessons learnt during the programme so as to further contribute to the youth savings evidence base, and inform the MasterCard Foundation's approach to the funding and programming of long-term, multi-country programmes and partnerships.

The research methods included a review and synopsis of key documentation, participating in the YouthSave Learning and Exchange Conference in Toronto in March 2015, interviews with 97 stakeholders and focus-group discussions with young people in each of the four countries. 

The evaluation questions were analysed and reported according to five thematic areas which had been identified by the consortium as priority learning areas. While the evaluation captured the achievements of YouthSave, it provided insight into the design and implementation of large, complex programmes by a consortium of partners that had informed the foundation's funding and programming strategy. 

During the evaluation the team also revisited YouthSave's “theory of influence”. This is the creation of knowledge and information to achieve broader systemic impact for youth. It also identified the need for the programme's learning agenda to be taken further and to be disseminated at a country level. Since the evaluation, the YouthSave partners have achieved a high level of dissemination and held dialogue workshops in each of the project countries.

Learning partner for ASISA Foundation

Project name:
Learning partner for the ASISA Foundation

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Youth economic opportunities
Financial Services Strategy
Education

Area of Expertise:
Ongoing support as a learning partner

Client:
ASISA Foundation

Date:
2014 - ongoing

Country:
South Africa


The ASISA Foundation was established by the Association for Savings and Investment South Africa (ASISA) under their Foster the Future initiative to implement meaningful consumer financial education (CFE) initiatives on behalf of the industry, with the explicit goal of becoming a centre of best practice for CFE. 

To achieve this goal and become a thought leader in this field, the foundation places a great deal of importance on the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of its CFE programmes, and the learning that comes through this process. 

By continuously learning from its own CFE programmes and adapting its approach to CFE in response, the foundation is able to generate lessons and good practices regarding the implementation and M&E of CFE programmes more broadly. The foundation then disseminates these lessons to the ASISA membership as well as to other organisations in the financial sector implementing CFE programmes. 

The foundation first contracted Genesis as its monitoring, evaluation and learning partner in 2014 to evaluate and provide ongoing feedback on its pilot CFE programme, Saver Waya-Waya. This evaluation generated a number of lessons and recommendations. The most notable of these was the effectiveness of repeat messaging through a variety of delivery mechanisms, and the importance of targeting groups of individuals who are in a similar stage of life so as to better contextualise the messaging. 

Considering these lessons, the foundation has since funded three, more targeted, interventions. These interventions have all been designed explicitly, based on the recommendations emerging from the evaluation of the pilot Saver Waya-Waya programme: 

Project Qaphela/Wagewise: This programme targets employed workers and focuses on the importance of understanding payslips, debt and benefit statements. The programme was implemented and evaluated in 2015 and in 2016. A third phase of the programme will begin in 2017. Each iteration has informed the design of the following phase.
Saver Waya-Waya TVET: This programme targets young adults through Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and includes a soft-skills component to prepare the students for the world of work. The programme was implemented and evaluated in 2016.
Saver Waya-Waya FLAME: This programme targets mature adults through savings groups and community centres and incorporates a micro-enterprise element to the CFE. This programme is currently underway. 

Genesis continues to work in close partnership with the foundation as its monitoring, evaluation and learning partner across its full portfolio of CFE programmes. Through this partnership, Genesis has directly unlocked value for the foundation by providing actionable recommendations to improve the design of its programmes.

Top photo: TVET students perform their industrial theatre production as part of  ASISA's Saver Waya-Waya programme

SAVER WAYA-­‐WAYA: ASISA Foundation’s Financial Literacy Programme

Mid-term review of project to support agri-finance innovation

Project name:
Mid-term evaluation of the Financial Inclusion for Smallholder Farmers in Africa Project (FISFAP)

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion
Agricultural finance

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)

Date:
2017

Country:
Ghana
Kenya
Tanzania


The Financial Inclusion for Smallholder Farmers in Africa Project (FISFAP) is a five-year USD 15.5-million project funded by the MasterCard Foundation and implemented by AGRA, which aims to improve food security and incomes of over 700 000 smallholder farmers in Ghana, Kenya and Tanzania. 

The project provides grants and technical assistance to organisations by developing innovations that improve farmer access to critical financial and non-financial services that can improve their productivity and operations. It also conducts a range of learning activities, aimed at crowding in financial service providers, governments and other organisations to deliver improved financial and non-financial products and services for smallholder farmers.

In 2017, in the third year of FISFAP’s implementation, Genesis was contracted to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the project and provide a review of the project to date. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a reasoned and independent view of the performance of the project against its intended goals and objectives, as well as its design, achievement and challenges. 

The evaluation was conducted using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, including a desktop review; 42 key informant interviews with project staff, partner organisations, consultants and external stakeholders; site visits and focus group discussions with smallholder farmers accessing the products or services funded under FISFAP.

The findings were presented in eight key areas: progress against targets; partner selection and support; implementation successes and challenges; understanding and meeting clients’ needs; impact and additionality; financial sustainability, strategic alignment; and monitoring, evaluation and learning. 

Short evaluative overviews of each of FISFAP’s grantees were also provided. The evaluation concluded by providing recommendations to inform future strategy and identify course corrections to adjust project weaknesses as well as enhance and extend project strengths.

Microfinance sector in Rwanda still needs support

Project name:
End of project evaluation for the Microfinance Challenge Fund Rwanda

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Market systems development
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
Access to Finance Rwanda (AFR)

Date:
2017

Country:
Rwanda


Genesis Analytics evaluated the Microfinance Challenge Fund Rwanda and found that the Rwandan microfinance industry still needs support.

Genesis was contracted by Access to Finance Rwanda (AFR) to conduct the evaluation of the Microfinance Challenge Fund Rwanda, which was designed and capitalized by KfW to address the microfinance industry in Rwanda’s inability to self-correct on the issues of weak technical capacity and access to refinancing.

KfW signed a grant agreement with the Government of Rwanda for €3-million to be channelled through AFR for the support of microfinance institutions (MFIs), and in April 2014 the Microfinance Challenge Fund was established. The fund provided microfinance institutions (MFIs) with refinancing and technical training and assistance for a period of three years.

The purpose of the evaluation Genesis conducted was to provide a holistic review of the fund, including its projects, take stock of how the fund performed, and assess the degree to which its objectives had been achieved. 

The evaluation approach amalgamated a sector review and a framework of good Challenge Fund practices, to create an analysis framework. Data and information collected through a document review, and engagements with the sector, programme staff and clients then fed into this analysis framework to answer the evaluation questions posed and inform the option analysis.

Using the findings of this evaluation Genesis reflected on the lessons learnt through the fund’s implementation and conducted a feasibility analysis for a second phase. Finally, based on the evaluation and an assessment of the recommendations, we provided key considerations for AFR to consider when deciding whether to support and expand the fund.

The results of the project were presented in March 2017 to key stakeholders in the microfinance sector. Stakeholders present included representatives from the Bank of Rwanda, commercial banks, microfinance institutions, donor agencies, industry organisations and NGOs. A robust and frank conversation was facilitated between these stakeholders, where the issues facing the sector were aired and interrogated.

Value assessment of Access to Finance Rwanda

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Genesis studies why 30% of SA births go unregistered

Project name:
Implementation evaluation of the birth registration programme

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation

Sector:
Public and Social
Health

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, Department of Home Affairs (South Africa)

Date:
2016 - 2018

Country:
South Africa


Birth registration is a constitutional right for all born in South Africa. To extend access to this essential service, the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) has implemented a range of interventions targeting early registration of birth (ERB), within 30 days of birth. 

The key intervention is the hospital footprint programme, which enables ERB at connected healthcare facilities. Genesis conducted an implementation evaluation of these DHA-led interventions that was commissioned within the South African National Evaluation Plan. 

The purpose of the evaluation was to systematically uncover the constraints that hinder ERB. Due to the complexity of the birth registration system, Genesis employed systems thinking for the evaluation. 

Genesis also prepared a theory of change for birth registration and used the OECD DAC Criteria for Programme Evaluation as the foundation of the evaluation framework. The evaluation methods included key informant interviews, observations at sites (DHA offices and healthcare facilities), interviews with registering parents and guardians, an extensive literature review, and an analysis of departmental data. 

The evaluation findings and recommendations were disseminated to, and validated with, the Evaluation Steering Committee and a broader stakeholder group. The Evaluation Steering Committee and DHA exco have accepted all 13 recommendations and will adopt a management improvement plan for implementation of the recommendations.

Partners with Rockefeller on Digital initiative

Project name:
Monitoring and Evaluation of Digital Jobs Africa

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation

Sector:
Youth economic opportunities

Area of Expertise:
Ongoing support as a learning partner

Client:
Rockerfeller Foundation

Date:
2016 - ongoing

Country:
Kenya
South Africa


Africa’s populations are growing at a rapid pace and job opportunities are not keeping up with the growth, particularly among the youth. Youth unemployment is increasingly a challenge in many African countries and South Africa is no exception.

To overcome this The Rockefeller Foundation launched the Digital Jobs Africa (DJA) initiative in 2013 to catalyse new, sustainable employment opportunities and skills training for African youth, with a focus on the ICT sector. The goal of the DJA is to influence change in business practice by demonstrating the value of impact sourcing and contribute to the social and economic well-being of the youth and their circle of influence.

In order to influence change in business practices, the DJA needs to identify and showcase the benefits of impact sourcing to increase commitment to this among new corporate partners. Genesis has been contracted to fulfill this objective as the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) partner for the DJA.

Additionally, Rockefeller aims to pursue a results-based management approach to the management of the DJA, where on-going learnings are fed back into the initiative’s design and implementation to maximise its effectiveness and impact. Ensuring that this approach is achieved by the initiative is the mandate of the M&E partner. Rockefeller aims to promote accountability of the initiative’s disbursements, which is the final objective of the M&E partner.

Final evaluation of Banking on Change

Project name:
Final evaluation of Banking on Change

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
A CARE International programme managed by Plan UK and Barclays

Date:
2015 - 2016

Country:
Egypt
Ghana
India
Kenya
Tanzania
Zambia


Banking on Change was a partnership between Barclays, CARE International UK and Plan UK aimed at extending savings-led financial services to vulnerable individuals. 

The programme had three core components: the introduction and expansion of the Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) methodology to low-income youth and adults, the delivery of various forms of training to the VSLAs, including financial literacy, enterprise, employability and bank literacy training, and to link a third of the Banking on Change VSLAs in Africa to Barclays and other formal financial institutions. 

The programme was implemented in two three-year phases. Phase 2 had a greater focus on young people and was rolled out from 2013 to 2015 in Egypt, Ghana, India, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. 

Genesis was contracted by the partnership to conduct a final evaluation of Phase 2 to understand the achievements and impact of the programme and to document the key learnings that have emerged to inform future efforts in savings-led financial inclusion for the youth. 

The research methods employed by the Genesis team included a desktop review of data and documentation, 45 stakeholder interviews at the global and country levels, and 12 focus-group discussions with savings group members in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. 

The evaluation was an important validation of Banking on Change's achievements and highlighted lessons that informed each partner's future approaches to design and programming in the financial inclusion and youth economic opportunities sectors.

Impact evaluation of POWER Africa in Rwanda

Project name:
Impact evaluation of POWER Africa - Rwanda

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
A MasterCard Foundation programme managed by CARE Canada

Date:
2014 - ongoing

Country:
Rwanda


CARE Canada’s Promoting Opportunities for Women’s Economic Empowerment in Rural Africa (POWER Africa) initiative, funded by the MasterCard Foundation, aims to improve financial inclusion in Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia and Rwanda by linking village loan and savings associations (VSLAs) with formal financial institutions. 

Promoting opportunities for Financial Inclusion in Rwanda (PROFIR), as the project is called in Rwanda, aims to allow more than 180 000 people access to formal financial services. The PROFIR project began in November 2013 and will continue until December 2017.

While the goal of PROFIR is to improve people’s lives by linking their savings groups to the formal financial sector, a broader objective could be to design an intervention that has great impact and is able to be scaled and replicated in other contexts by various financial-sector players. Thus, there is emphasis on measuring the impact of PROFIR using a rigorous evaluation of the intervention.

Genesis was contracted by CARE Canada in 2014 to conduct an impact evaluation on PROFIR. The evaluation was designed to be as unobtrusive as possible without compromising its credibility and statistical validity. 

PROFIR’s quantitative impact will be estimated using difference in differences, while case studies on “typical” members are being used to provide qualitative depth to the study. The baseline for the evaluation was completed in early 2015, and the end line will be completed in the latter half of 2017.

Helping innovation for Africa’s rural farm families

Project name:
Helping to innovate a new sector of microfinance for Africa’s rural farm families

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Financial Services Strategy

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
A MasterCard Foundation programme managed by One Acre Fund

Date:
2015 - 2016

Country:
Burundi
Kenya
Rwanda


Despite the economic significance of agriculture in East Africa, smallholder farmers in the region are extremely poor. Many produce only enough food for their families. 

These smallholder farmers' low productivity is exacerbated by a lack of access to quality inputs, financing and efficient farming techniques.

The One Acre Fund was established to extend financing, technical support and other services to smallholder farmers. In 2013, the MasterCard Foundation provided a grant to the One Acre Fund to expand its reach in Kenya, Rwanda and Burundi, and to strengthen its core systems and become a knowledge disseminator. In 2016, One Acre Fund and the MasterCard Foundation engaged Genesis to conduct the mid-term evaluation of this grant.

The evaluation used a mixed-methods, participatory and iterative approach. This included a review and synopsis of key documentation, interviews with stakeholders in rural agriculture financing (RAF), field observations and focus group discussions (FGDs) with existing, previous, and non-One Acre Fund farmers. 

As part of these FGDs, the evaluation team made use of a pocket voting participatory approach to elicit more honest reactions to questions on the constraints facing the farmers, as well as what they found to be the most useful component of One Acre Fund’s package. The evaluation provided insights to inform strategic decisions for the organisation, as well as to inform future efforts in the broader RAF sector. 

Genesis also put forward recommendations to the One Acre Fund to consider for the rest of the grant term and beyond to maximise its impact.

TOP: One Acre Fund testing different post-harvest processing methods

Meet the Team

Areas of Service Expertise

  • Design, review and support of M&E systems
  • Evaluation & impact assessment
  • Ongoing support as a learning partner
  • Market systems development
  • Financial inclusion

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TWO GRANT-FUNDED PROJECTS TO SUPPORT SGB SECTOR

We won two grant-funded projects through the ANDE Catalyst Fund for Impact Measurement in Africa. The current round is funded by the UK Department for International Development’s (DFID) Impact Programme. 

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Digital revolution leads to entirely new forms of work

Alyna Wyatt and Amreen Choda of the Evaluation for Development practice led a session how the digital revolution has not just changed how individuals work in traditional jobs but it has also enabled entirely new forms of work at the one-day “Unlocking Opportunities for Youth” event convened by Mercy Corps in Nairobi in May 2018.

It brought together more than 100 thought leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators, and practitioners to explore how technology and innovation can unlock new work opportunities for young women and men in Africa and address the persistent youth unemployment challenge. Digital skills revolution will create winners and losers in labour market

More information about our practice

Our Evaluation for Development practice has extensive experience assisting governments, companies, international donors, foundations and non-profits in Africa with the information and insight they need to improve their interventions and produce better results, ultimately achieving greater impact on economies and people’s lives.

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Projects

Project

Evaluation of Microcred’s plan to bank a million new customers

Genesis Analytics was contracted to conduct an evaluation of the Mass Market Financial Inclusion (MMFI) project, which aims to provide access to key financial services for the unbanked populations of Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire and Madagascar.

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Project

Genesis evaluates government's evaluation system

Genesis, in partnership with UK-based IOD PARC, was appointed by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) in the Office of the Presidency to evaluate South Africa’s National Evaluation System.

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Leading the team

​Alyna Wyatt

Partner (Evaluation for Development)

​Alyna Wyatt
Partner (Evaluation for Development)
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Mishkah Jakoet

Principal

Mishkah Jakoet
Principal
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Emily Massey

Manager

Emily Massey
Manager
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Dhashni Naidoo

Manager

Dhashni Naidoo
Manager
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Caitlin Smit

Manager

Caitlin Smit
Manager
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Noel Verrinder

Manager (Kenya and UK)

Noel Verrinder
Manager (Kenya and UK)
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