Health

We work with our clients to develop solutions aimed at improving the health of populations throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Our region is beset by a range of diseases, both communicable and non-communicable, and has relatively weak health services. Within this context, we provide experts with decades of experience in the design, implementation and evaluation of health programmes.

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Expertise Areas

Research, monitoring and evaluation in Health

We design and implement a variety of research projects - from national household surveys to discrete and focused programme reviews or process evaluations. Our researchers have decades of experience in quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, and of applying these in a practical way, which ensures that our findings can be confidently used by the commissioning companies and organisations.

We like to work with clients on the design of an appropriate evaluation for their programmes, using robust methods and a cost-effective approach.

Behavioural sciences

A significant challenge in healthcare is persuading people to embrace a healthy lifestyle. Our team works on social and behaviour change communication programmes that are evidence-informed and designed for maximum impact.

We keep an eye firmly on the views and lives of target populations in order to design interventions that resonate with them, and not necessarily with public-health experts.

Our team has worked on addressing the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa for the past 20 years. This work has included finding ways to prevent HIV in adults and children, as well as ways to mitigate the impact of the epidemic, especially in the era before HIV treatment became widely available.

Our behavioural economists have also studied why people struggle with these lifestyle decisions, and have delivered a set of tools that are often cheaper to use, more effective in changing health behaviour and, ultimately, more effective at achieving better health outcomes.

Health economics and costing

Sustainable financing and the achievement of value for money in health interventions are increasingly recognised as key pillars in achieving the sustainable development goals for health and universal healthcare. At a time when many countries face large cuts to donor funding and competing demands for domestic resources, we provide technical support to decision makers in navigating this new reality.

Our team draws on multi-disciplinary skills in public financial management, health finance, costing, efficiency studies and other economic analyses, to inform health-financing policies, help build resilient health systems and public financial-management capacities, leading to improved healthcare in the region.

Sustainable health systems

Through user-centred design and collaborative approaches, our team works to build capacity and empower system users to carry out their work.

We consider the principles of organisational and behaviour change to institutionalise desired behaviours among users – from clients to healthcare professionals to the broader public.

Our technical support is tailored to meet the local needs of users thereby addressing critical gaps in capacity.

Projects

Comprehensive strategy to improve Primary Healthcare in SA

Project name:
A strategy to improve Primary Healthcare in South Africa

Service:
Research, monitoring and evaluation in Health
Sustainable health systems

Sector:
Health

Client:
Population Services International (PSI)

Date:
2019

Country:
South Africa


Genesis was contracted to assist Population Services International (PSI) and Society for Family Health (SFH) to develop PSI’s South Africa strategy.

PSI is an organisation that optimises health impact by developing targeted solutions that increase consumer choice and improve access to quality, affordable health products.

SFH is a leading South African public health non-profit, non-governmental organisation and PSI network member that brings quality health products and services to vulnerable and low-income communities.

We were asked to develop PSI’s South Africa strategy in line with its global strategy of universal health coverage (UHC) using our existing local sectoral experience and extensive understanding of the South African health system. The strategy aimed to meet the needs of low-income South Africans, shaping the policies and funding mechanisms, and focusing on capacity development, both internal and external, in the primary healthcare (PHC) sector.

Our approach

We completed a landscaping exercise of PHC in South Africa through a desktop review and key informant interviews (KII) with stakeholders in the public and private health sectors. These covered (a) the structure of PHC, (b) challenges and innovations in PHC service delivery and financing, (c) the experience of low-income South Africans in navigating PHC, and (d) the regulatory environment. It was important to also consider how these elements would intersect with the changes that the implementation of the National Health Insurance (NHI) policy could bring.

Recommendations for unlocking value

Using the making-markets-better-for-the-poor (M4P) framework – an approach that aims to improve the long-term efficiency and inclusiveness of markets in developing countries – we identified gaps in the South African PHC supply, demand, and regulatory environments where PSI-led interventions could unlock value. One such recommendation is for PSI to use its expertise with mobile and technology-enabled service delivery approaches to deliver youth-friendly services.

By framing the PHC landscape, understanding the expertise and vision of our client, and using the M4P framework, we were able to deliver a comprehensive strategy with concrete recommendations for the future roles of PSI and SFH in the PHC sector in the country. Initial client feedback has been extremely positive and PSI is likely to adopt the strategy we have proposed.

Strengthening HIV prevention through facilitated South-to-South learning 

Project name:
SSLN

Service:
Sustainable health systems

Sector:
Health

Client:
Global HIV Prevention Coalition (GPC); Funder: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)

Date:
2020 - 2021

Country:
Ghana
Kenya
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
South Africa
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe


Genesis, in partnership with the University of Manitoba, is supporting the Global HIV Prevention Coalition (GPC) to establish and strengthen shared learning of best practice among 10 African countries heavily burdened by HIV. This is facilitated through the South-South Learning Network (SSLN), a GPC initiative.

The SSLN aims to strengthen country HIV prevention programmes through shared learning of good country practices. The network provides countries with a platform to gain experiential knowledge from peers, harness and share good prevention learnings, and inform grant-making and technical assistance needs. This engagement empowers countries to adapt interventions to the unique African context. This phase of the network seeks to establish a proof of concept and therefore focuses on a limited number of countries and technical areas, including condoms and key populations (KPs).

Genesis’s role

A project team, which includes experts in HIV prevention from the University of Manitoba, pilots this learning network for prevention managers and implementers across 10 African countries. Through the SSLN, we engage with key country stakeholders, including government officials, members of national AIDS councils, civil society, programme implementers and development partners.

To identify learnings on good prevention practice, countries are assisted by the project team to complete HIV prevention self-assessment tools (PSAT) for each HIV prevention pillar they form part of – either condoms, key populations, or both. The completed self-assessment tool provides detailed insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the current condom and key population programmes, which in turn feed into country learning agendas, plans of action and technical assistance plans.

The SSLN will facilitate meaningful engagements between and across countries and technical areas through carefully constructed webinars, capacity-building sessions, site visits and regional workshops. Countries will also be supported in documenting and disseminating programme best practice.

Innovative funding for project to address teenage pregnancy

Project name:
Social impact bond to address HIV and pregnancy in school-going adolescent girls and young women in South Africa

Service:
Health economics and costing

Sector:
Health
Africa’s youth

Client:
SA Medical Research Council (GA contracted with Wits Health Consortium)

Date:
2019 - ongoing

Country:
South Africa


Social impact bonds (SIBs) are an innovative financing method in which a social investor provides working capital for a project and is only repaid by government or a donor (the outcomes funder) if successful outcomes are achieved. The mechanism has several advantages in that it raises capital from new sources, aligns the incentives for success of all stakeholders, provides space for flexibility and innovation, and is supported by rigorous monitoring and evaluation.

Adolescent girls and young women face a myriad of social, economic and health challenges in South Africa, including high rates of teenage pregnancy and school drop-outs, disproportionately high rates of HIV acquisition, and partner violence. The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) has researched and developed an optimal package of services targeting adolescent girls and young women and has secured outcomes funding for an SIB from the South African National Treasury through the Department of Science and Technology.

Genesis Analytics has been appointed by SAMRC, together with a consortium of partners that include Wits Health Consortium, the Bertha Centre for Innovation and UK-based SIB specialists, Social Finance, to provide technical support to the SIB process, from the design of the SIB to investor mobilisation and co-creation of the project and its target results.

The role of Genesis is focused on developing a cost and budget model for the SIB intervention and to guide value-for-money considerations in the conceptualisation and co-design of the intervention for young women in schools. Genesis is also required to contribute cost and budget information to the investor mobilisation process and to support project partners in developing a financial model that determines the repayment triggers and repayment amounts to the social investor that are tied to outcomes achieved.

The project expects to achieve the following outcomes:

1. Reduce new HIV infections in adolescent girls and young women in schools through the provision of ARV prophylaxis drugs and behavioural interventions

2. Reduce unintended pregnancies through contraception services and related pregnancy interventions and improve pregnancy care for learners who do become pregnant.

3. Increase the rate of viral suppression in schoolgirls who are HIV positive through optimisation of testing, treatment and adherence support.

Evaluating NHI Phase 1 pilot implementation for Department of Health

Project name:
Evaluation of Phase 1 implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI) interventions in the NHI pilot districts in South Africa

Service:
Research, monitoring and evaluation in Health
Sustainable health systems

Sector:
Health
Public and Social

Client:
South African National Department of Health

Date:
2017 - 2019

Country:
South Africa


South Africa faces numerous challenges in delivering high quality health services to the majority of its population.

The National Development Plan (NDP) 2030 indicates that the country should deal with the expensive cost of private healthcare and address the problems of quality of public healthcare to ensure Universal Health Care (UHC). UHC is being pursued in South Africa through the government’s policy of National Health Insurance (NHI).

According to the NHI policy, the implementation of NHI would happen in three phases. Phase 1 primarily focused on preparing primary health care (PHC) for NHI through the introduction of health system strengthening (HSS) interventions in 10 NHI pilot districts across the country. Implementation of Phase 1 began in 2012 and came to an end in 2017.

We undertook the evaluation of the NHI Phase 1 implementation in South Africa. The main aim was to assess whether the NHI Phase 1 interventions had achieved their objective of HSS in PHC facilities. Furthermore, the evaluation aimed to identify lessons learnt from Phase 1 in an attempt to sustain and scale up interventions in the future.

We completed secondary data analysis in the form of two literature reviews. The first assessed the implementation of NHI in other low-to-middle income countries to identify lessons that can be learnt by South Africa. The second review summarised previous NHI annual assessments. This review was used to identify gaps in implementation to date and to develop tools for primary data collection.

Primary data collection was completed at national, provincial, district and facility levels. We visited the 10 NHI pilot districts and key stakeholders were interviewed to gain insight to the successes, challenges and lessons learnt from Phase1 implementation.

In parallel, we analysed the quantitative data from the District Health Information System (DHIS) to assess the performance of the NHI indicators in PHC in the last five years. We compiled an in-depth evaluation report which highlighted both the successes and challenges of NHI phase 1 implementation and made recommendations for future planning and implementation, to support the National Department of Health (NDOH) as it transitioned into phase 2 implementation.

The evaluation findings and recommendations were presented in Cape Town, in November 2018, to the then Minister of Health, Dr Aaron Motsoaledi.

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Campaign does improve men's perceptions on HIV testing

Project name:
Impact evaluation of the Testa Boy campaign and baseline assessment on the knowledge of HIV testing and treatment among men and women in South Africa

Service:
Behavioural sciences

Sector:
Health

Client:
Centre for Communication Impact

Date:
2017

Country:
South Africa


Genesis Analytics was contracted by the Centre for Communication Impact to evaluate the impact of CCI’s Testa Boy campaign. The campaign aims to address the slow uptake of HIV testing among men. It promotes the benefits of testing under the slogan: “Negative or positive, you are the same person, Testa Boy.”

The campaign was announced nation-wide on TV, radio, outdoor media, film and internet-based media. Reports of campaign ambassadors were written and posted through videos on YouTube, and promoted on social media. Billboards featuring the campaign ambassadors were placed in 61 locations.

Genesis, in partnership with Freshly Ground Insights (FGI), conducted face-to-face interviews with 3 000 South Africans aged 18-34.

Our evaluation showed that the Testa Boy campaign improved perceptions among men who tested for HIV, as well as actual testing behaviour. Those who were exposed were 50% more likely to agree that men who tested for HIV were regarded as strong and responsible. Those exposed were also 40% more likely to have had HIV testing in the past 12 months. The study found that men were 60% more likely to be tested if five or more of their friends had also tested for HIV.

These findings highlight the value of campaigns to improve perceptions about HIV testing and promote behaviour change.

The advert that has been used in the campaign

Improving the accurate costing of HIV programmes in Africa

Project name:
Understanding HIV Costs and Sustainability (UCAS)

Service:
Health economics and costing

Sector:
Health
Human development

Client:
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Date:
2020 - ongoing

Country:
Kenya
South Africa
Tanzania
Uganda


Health costing tools are useful for policy makers and other stakeholders to understand and predict finances related to different health programmes. There are various activities currently underway to refine these costing tools.

The US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is leading research efforts to better understand the comprehensive costs of delivering HIV-related services to inform planning and improve the efficiency of health service delivery.

PEPFAR implementers are using the activity-based costing for management (ABC-M) methodology to estimate the comprehensive HIV costs in four-to-seven African countries. At the same time, the Gates Foundation has approved a grant to Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to conduct costing of health services at primary healthcare (PHC) level, including HIV services in several African countries.

Genesis has been awarded a contract to undertake a number of learning activities that will improve countries’ abilities to accurately cost their HIV programmes, using national data systems, and interpret existing cost data, thereby enabling more effective planning, budgeting and ongoing decision-making. Learning activities in this project will examine four areas of research:

  • Describing the landscape of health costing and resource tracking efforts at a global and country specific levels and developing a framework for understanding the key costing and expenditure tracking tools in HIV, TB and PHC.
  • Developing a deep understanding of the differences between ABC-M and the MSH costing approach and methodologies, and the implications on costs and uses.
  • Reviewing how available cost data is being used by decision makers to shape policy and inform programme management decisions.
  • Identifying the opportunities and feasibility for institutionalisation of ABC-M in selected geographies to routinely collect and analyse cost data from national data systems.

Ultimately the findings from this work will assist stakeholders, partners and in-country stakeholders to understand which costing methods and tools are best suited to inform planning and decision-making for HIV-related services. And how these tools can be tailored to local data and systems that allows for the routine generation of accurate and comprehensive costing data for HIV programmes.

Sexual and reproductive services will improve health of SA's youth

Project name:
The Understandibility, Accessibility and Acceptability of the Provisions of Sexual and Reproductive Health Services in Schools in South Africa

Sector:
Health
Education
Public and Social
Africa’s youth

Area of Expertise:
Behavioural sciences

Client:
Department of Basic Education (funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA))

Date:
2018 - 2019

Country:
South Africa


Access to sexual and reproductive (SRH) services, including contraceptives, HIV testing and counselling, pregnancy testing and family planning are desirable in schools as youth have limited information and access to these services and products.

Genesis Analytics supported the Department of Basic Education (DBE) to investigate the understanding, accessibility and acceptability of providing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to boys and girls attending school in South Africa.

Our team undertook discussions with school leaners to understand what their SRH needs were and how best to deliver these services and products that would encourage their appropriate use among learners.

We also conducted interviews with teachers and discussions with parents to understand what was acceptable and feasible in terms of making these services and products available at schools.

The research findings were presented at multiple platforms to the DBE, donor groups such as the Gates Foundation and UNFPA, as well as to life orientation officials.

We used the results to workshop models of service delivery with NGOs, donor groups, broader government departments and academic institutions. The models consider the realities of learners in both rural and urban areas, and the roles that both government and NGOs play in making vital SRH services and products available to the South African youth.

A rapid decline in fertility, investment in family planning, improved child survival and educating girls allows young people to contribute meaningfully to South Africa’s economy. By improving the sexual and reproductive health outcomes of our youth, South Africa can take full advantage of its demographic dividend.

Behaviourally informed messaging increases medication adherence

Project name:
Developing behaviourally informed content for GP Connect

Service:
Behavioural sciences

Sector:
Health

Client:
PPO Serve

Date:
2019

Country:
South Africa


Genesis Analytics was commissioned by PPO Serve to help improve medication adherence among HIV-positive patients enrolled on the GP Care Cell (GPCC) programme. The programme offers free HIV treatment through a network of private GPs.

We developed behaviourally informed messaging for its new low-cost messaging platform - GP Connect – that is being rolled out to all new patients on GPCC.

Why is this project important?

The second and third ‘90s’ of the UNAIDS global HIV treatment target aim for 90% of all HIV-positive people to be on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and 90% of them to be virally suppressed. However, adhering to daily medication for life can be difficult, particularly for people dealing with the shock of being recently diagnosed, and having to form an entirely new habit, often with little support.

The messaging provided through the GP Connect aims to address this problem by providing ongoing psycho-social support through sending regular behaviourally informed WhatsApp messages to people on the GPCC programme. Similar programmes have had great success in increasing ART adherence rates at low cost. In rural Kenya, the introduction of messaging increased adherence rates by 13 percentage points.

What did the team do?

The Genesis team created a full year’s supportive messaging for patients - from the day of their diagnosis to their last appointment at GPCC.

We put a name and face to GP Connect – Sindiwe, a digital avatar, who simulates peer messaging. The message is informed by the latest research in behavioural science. It is sequenced to support habit formation and then moves on to more complex health-living behaviours. Sindiwe’s messages includes basic HIV information, tips for taking ART, support in establishing new habits, commitment devices, treatment pick-up reminders, and gamification to reinforce ART adherence behaviours.

What is happening now?

Sindiwe and her messages were positively received in user testing of GP Connect. Workshop participants view her as a buddy who is likeable and easily trusted.

GP Connect is currently being finalised and will go live soon for new GPCC patients. The programme expects to increase the number of patients initiated on ART and retained in care by 3-10 percentage points.

This project demonstrates how simple, low-cost applications of behavioural science to existing health programmes can complement and step-change their ability to affect sustainable behaviour-change.

Genesis counts cost of lifestyle diseases for Gauteng government

Project name:
Burden of lifestyle diseases on the public health sector in Gauteng

Service:
Behavioural Science

Sector:
Health
Public and Social

Client:
Gauteng Office of the Premier, Planning Division

Date:
2018

Country:
South Africa


Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) of lifestyle are becoming the leading cause of death in most regions of the world.

South Africa faces a quadruple burden of disease: the HIV/AIDS epidemic paired with a high burden of TB, high rates of maternal and child mortality, high levels of violence and injuries, and a growing burden of NCDs. NCDs are disproportionately affecting poor people living in urban settings. The NCDs drive a rising demand for chronic-disease care and pose an increasing burden on the health system.

The Gauteng Office of the Premier’s Planning Division contracted Genesis Analytics to determine the health and financial effects of NCDs on Gauteng’s health system for 2017-2030 and to recommend policies and best practices to address the growing burden in Gauteng.

Genesis developed a model to project the size and profile of the Gauteng population, prevalence of the selected risk factors and NCDs, and costs borne by the Gauteng public health system.

Our projections show that by 2030 the number of NCD cases in Gauteng will increase by 42% to 4.5 million. There will be high levels of morbidity (2.1 million disability-adjusted life years) and mortality (65 700 deaths) because of NCDs.

This high burden has significant associated costs. NCDs account for nearly 40% of healthcare spending in Gauteng. This spending will lead to a 39% increase over 13 years to R19.2 billion in 2030, without adjusting for inflation. The projected NCD costs are expected to outpace Gauteng Department of Health budget increases.

Genesis prioritised a number of “best buys” (according to the World Health Organisation) to address the health and financial burden in Gauteng, which would bolster the efforts of the National Department of Health. Specifically the province should invest in mass-media campaigns to promote behaviour change and awareness of a healthy diet and physical activity.

This is a cost-effective intervention and the upfront investment will ultimately result in long-term savings and benefits for the province. For NCDs Gauteng needs to develop well-prioritised, efficient and effective treatment and rehabilitation services for chronic-disease care.

GENESIS CO-MANAGES UNAIDS TECHNICAL SUPPORT MECHANISM

Project name:
Technical Support Mechanism

Service:
Sustainable health systems

Sector:
Health
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
HIV prevention
Project management
Monitoring and evaluation

Client:
UNAIDS

Date:
2018 - ongoing

Country:
Angola
Botswana
Burundi
Kenya
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Namibia
Rwanda
South Africa
Swaziland
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe


The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS) has established the Technical Support Mechanism (TSM), a project meant to support the provision of high-quality technical assistance in three regions, namely the East and Southern Africa (ESA), Asia-Pacific (AP), and West and Central Africa (WCA). The TSM is set up to be adaptable and responsive to country needs to accelerate progress toward achieving the Fast-Track targets and the goals of the 2016 Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS.

Genesis Analytics, as part of the Oxford Policy Management-led consortium, is tasked with managing all TSM operations in the East and Southern Africa region. Through the use of quality assured regional and national consultants, countries are assisted with developing evidence-informed HIV national strategic plans and HIV prevention plans aligned with UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets. They develop funding requests to the Global Fund, streamline the grant-making process, and improve Global Fund grant implementation as well as ensure the sustainability of interventions and programmes.

HIV prevention has been noted by UNAIDS as a priority because the HIV incidence, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, has been difficult to reduce. Genesis Analytics has been tasked to lead the HIV prevention thematic area and work closely with the UNAIDS secretariat to devise strategies that are country adaptable, efficient, impactful and sustainable.

Showing value for money and impact is key for UNAIDS, making the TSM project’s monitoring and evaluation a crucial aspect. Genesis Analytics developed the TSM’s results framework and a related theory of change (ToC) through to the impact result level. The Genesis Analytics team continues to implement the monitoring and evaluation plan by undertaking data reviews monthly to check quality and completeness, and to flag any problems with implementing the project.

Genesis continues to manage UNAIDS technical support programme

Scaling up male circumcision in SA to prevent HIV infections

Project name:
Medical Male Circumcision (MMC) Sustain

Service:
Sustainable health systems

Sector:
Health
Public and Social

Client:
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Date:
2018 - 2021

Country:
South Africa


South Africa has the world’s largest HIV epidemic with an estimated seven million people living with HIV and more than 380,000 new HIV infections each year. Medical male circumcision (MMC) has been identified as a key HIV prevention intervention for South Africa as it reduces the risk of female to male HIV transmission by approximately 60%.

In 2010, the South African National Department of Health (NDOH) began implementing a plan to medically circumcise men between the ages 15-49. By 2019, the national MMC programme has achieved extraordinary scale having circumcised close to 3.8 million men.

MMC SUSTAIN (Medical Male Circumcision Scale Up and Sustainability to Avert New HIV Infections) is a three-year investment from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). The grant was awarded to MMC SUSTAIN, comprising Genesis Analytics and the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD) in September 2018. The strategic goal is to go beyond scaling up the national MMC programme and transitioning toward sustainability of MMC in South Africa. The MMC SUSTAIN team is providing technical assistance to the South African national MMC programme to build resilient local systems that successfully plan, effectively manage, and efficiently execute the programme at scale.

Our team provides technical assistance to the South African National MMC programme. We design and implement behaviourally informed interventions to understand the causes of, and solutions to, existing low levels of ownership, motivation and capacity across the programme. Interventions will aim to:

  • Improve integration of the MMC programme across public health services;
  • Encourage positive feedback processes;
  • Increase adherence to quality assurance and data reporting processes;
  • Improve planning and management.

By incorporating social/non-financial incentives into the performance management, we can improve motivation of the programme staff.

Our support for the MMC national programme will focus on technical assistance in eight districts across three provinces, namely KwaZulu-Natal (eThekwini, Amajuba, iLembe, uMgungundlovu), Mpumalanga (Gert Sibande), and Gauteng (City of Johannesburg, West Rand and Ekurhuleni).

Behavioural economics is effective at driving behaviour change

We provide support for govt plan of 2,5m male circumcisions by 2022

Meet the Team

Areas of Service Expertise

  • Research, monitoring and evaluation in Health
  • Health economics and costing
  • Sustainable health systems

More information about our Health practice

Our FOCUS is on public health in Africa.

We develop CUSTOMISED SOLUTIONS to improve
the health of people throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

We deliver ROBUST ANALYSIS for clients across the Health sector.

Our DEEP TECHNICAL EXPERTISE and experience
enable our clients to make better decisions

Download the brochure

Projects

Project

Comprehensive strategy to improve Primary Healthcare in SA

Genesis was contracted to assist Population Services International (PSI) and Society for Family Health (SFH) to develop PSI’s South Africa strategy.

View Project
Project

Strengthening HIV prevention through facilitated South-to-South learning 

Genesis, in partnership with the University of Manitoba, is supporting the Global HIV Prevention Coalition (GPC) to establish and strengthen shared learning of best practice among 10 African countries heavily burdened by HIV. This is facilitated through the South-South Learning Network (SSLN), a GPC initiative.

View Project

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Leading the team

Saul Johnson

Managing Partner (Health)

Saul Johnson
Managing Partner (Health)
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​Sarah Magni

Partner

​Sarah Magni
Partner
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Steve Cohen

Principal

Steve Cohen
Principal
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Carl Schütte

Associate Principal

Carl Schütte
Associate Principal
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Vincent Shaw

Principal

Vincent Shaw
Principal

Lisa Mulenga

Programme Director (MMC)

Lisa Mulenga
Programme Director (MMC)
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Kerry Mangold

Programme Director (SSLN)

Kerry Mangold
Programme Director (SSLN)
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