Our new Human Development practice to focus building human capital

Genesis Analytics has launched the Human Development practice. The practice will help societies build social, intellectual and physical well-being, particularly among the most vulnerable. This purpose is central to our focus on Africa’s youth.

It will be led by Tomas Lievens, the former director of the Social Policy Programme at Oxford Policy Management. He built the programme into a highly regarded 75-person team working globally on cutting-edge projects.

The initial focus will be on innovative ways to finance universal coverage in areas such as health, nutrition, education and social protection. A subsequent service line will involve the design of adaptive delivery systems for these critical social services. The systems are responsive, flexible mechanisms that combine the best of public and private provision. Tomas will work closely with our colleagues in Health to exploit the exciting complementarities with that team. The practice will focus on Africa, but also work more widely. Tomas will be based in London and assume, over time, the role of director of Genesis’s UK subsidiary.

More about Tomas Lievens

Tomas is an experienced social policy economist with expertise in quantitative research and mixed research methods, health, education and WASH financing, health insurance, and health and education labour markets.

Much of his work is focused on public system and expenditure performance with a special interest in equity in financing and outcomes.

He carried out several expenditure reviews, including tracking surveys; performance, efficiency and costing studies; equity and benefit incidence analyses, often to inform health and education financing strategies. He worked extensively on fiscal questions, domestic resource mobilisation and sustainable financing of sector strategies. He also has a long-term research interest in health-worker motivation and behaviour to improve health labour market outcomes.

Until recently he was director of the Social Policy Programme at Oxford Policy Management where he managed consultants across health, education, social protection and poverty, child protection and social care services, nutrition and water. Previously he was adviser for the International Labour Organisation in Africa, economics adviser to the Belgian minister for international development and consulted with Philippe Naert, Dean of INSEAD Business School.

He holds masters’ degrees in Engineering from the University of Leuven in Belgium and in Economics from the University of Nottingham in the UK.