Climate change

Climate change represents a significant obstacle to sustained economic growth and poverty eradication. In sub-Saharan Africa, poor people are disproportionately exposed and vulnerable to climate change shocks such as floods, droughts and heat waves which destroy livelihoods and assets. At Genesis, our agriculture and infrastructure teams work together to help increase the resilience of individuals and communities to these climate shocks.

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Projects

SADC water and infrastructure projects

Project name:
Climate Resilience Infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF)

Service:
Project appraisal
Transaction advisory

Sector:
Climate change
Infrastructure
Water

Area of Expertise:
Project preparation

Client:
A DFID-funded facility managed by Adam Smith International

Date:
2013 – ongoing

Country:
Malawi
Mozambique
Namibia
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe


The Climate Resilient Infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF) is a DFID-funded facility that prepares water and infrastructure projects across SADC. It focuses on projects that build climate resilience, are pro-poor and are located in one of the SADC region’s 13 transboundary water basins. Under the CRIDF, Genesis is involved in the design and delivery of water infrastructure that fosters sustainable development of the region’s water, food and energy security.

Our work focuses on:    

Financial and economic appraisal of projects in order to assess a project’s impact, inform decision-making and to ensure financial, operational and social sustainability.

Leveraging and mobilising finance to support CRIDF in high-level engagement with donors and potential financiers to identify potential sources of financing, as well as in preparing projects for presentation and conducting the actual engagements.  

Genesis supports the programme across multiple individual water-preparation projects. For example, together with the African Development Bank, we are currently engaged in a project to assess the commercial viability of a hydro-electric plant on the border of Malawi and Tanzania. The project aims to develop an effective financing strategy and assess the potential for attracting private sector investors through public-private partnerships.

The Genesis project economist is leading the development of the financial and economic models, assessing the likely returns and benefits from the project and working to structure it in a way that is attractive to the private sector, while retaining important socio-economic development goals of the respective governments.

TOP and ABOVE: Building climate resilience in the Eastern Province, Zambia, through the construction of a dam and small-scale irrigation scheme.

TOP and ABOVE: Building climate resilience in the Eastern Province, Zambia, through the construction of a dam and small-scale irrigation scheme.

Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme

Project name:
Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Climate change
Agriculture and Agribusiness

Client:
A DFID programme managed by Adam Smith International

Date:
2015 – ongoing

Country:
Malawi
Mozambique
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe


The Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme (CSAP), funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), works to facilitate transformative change to the systems in which smallholder farmers operate in order to improve their livelihoods within the context of climate variability and change.

CSAP works across East and Southern Africa – initially in Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe – to increase the climate resilience of smallholder farmers by using targeted evidence, developing approaches for the uptake of sustainable and locally suited agricultural practices, and improving the wider enabling environment.

Climate-smart agriculture training

Climate-smart agriculture training

Genesis provides support for the programme’s agricultural development component. This seeks to pilot and, where appropriate, scale up ways of delivering information and services related to climate-smart agricultural practices that are tailored to the specific circumstances in which smallholder farmers operate.

Applying mulching and composting learnings

Applying mulching and composting learnings

In support of this component, the Genesis-appointed Zimbabwe country representative oversaw a rapid market systems analysis of key Zimbabwean agricultural value chains, including maize, sorghum, cotton, wheat, groundnuts and barley. 

The key objective of the analysis was to identify and present potential private-sector-driven projects that promote climate-smart agricultural practices among smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe to the CSAP regional programme team in order to assess funding requirements.

Building a climate-compatible development business case

Project name:
Building the business case for investment in climate-compatible development (CCD)

Service:
Project appraisal
Monitoring and evaluation

Sector:
Climate change
Water

Client:
Climate and Development Knowledge Network

Date:
2015

Country:
Rwanda


The Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) in Rwanda wanted to develop a business case for climate-compatible development in Rwanda.

The Genesis team visited project sites and reviewed the documentation of multiple climate-compatible development projects in the country to select those best suited for impact evaluations and building the business case. 

The team then developed the impact evaluation and cost-benefit analysis approaches for a selected number of these projects.

Plan expands water supply to 25 000 Malawians

Project name:
Feasibility study on Illovo Nchalo Water Supply and Sanitation Project

Service:
Project appraisal

Sector:
Water
Infrastructure
Climate change

Client:
Climate Resilience Infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF), DFID

Date:
2015 – ongoing

Country:
Malawi


Illovo Sugar Malawi wanted to improve the water supply for Nchalo town and the communities surrounding its sugar facility, which is an area characterised as very poor and lacking in clean water and sanitation.

Nchalo is in the Chikwawa district in the southern region of Malawi within which the Southern Region Water Board (SRWB) has jurisdiction over water supply infrastructure development and operations. A feasibility study was commissioned in response to the socio-economic challenges experienced in Chikwawa-Nchalo area.

With technical support from the Climate Resilient infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF) in collaboration with Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a PPP between Illovo and the SRWB was established in order to address the problem of access to safe water and improved sanitation in the area. Five options for the improvement of the water supply system and sanitation facilities in the area were considered.

The Genesis team did a cost-benefit analysis that determined a financial analysis of what would be the net return to the developer, and an economic analysis of what would be a net return to surrounding communities. Genesis’s analysis first resulted in the decision to proceed with the project. Secondly, and going beyond standard analysis and reverting to the engineers to help redesign the project to expand the water network to poorer communities not part of the original design, the Genesis team increased the economic impact of the project and its value for money.

The project is now expected to benefit an additional 12 000 people in the original target area. With the expansion to outlying villages, it is expected that 25 000 additional individuals in poorer, rural villages will also benefit from the project. Importantly, this will provide water for a growing population that would otherwise not have access to clean water. Formal access to water will have multiple benefits, primarily through improved sanitation and health and time savings, with the long-term benefits expected to be even larger.

Controlling flooding in the lower Incomati basin

Project name:
Lower Incomati Flood Risk Management

Service:
Project appraisal

Sector:
Water
Infrastructure
Climate change

Client:
Climate Resilience Infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF), DFID

Date:
2013 – ongoing

Country:
Mozambique


The Incomati River basin spans three countries (South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique) and is home to 500 000 people. The lower portion of the basin (located in Mozambique) is prone to flooding and chronic food insecurity, with high levels of poverty and vulnerability to climate change.

Better flood management is vital, but until now there has been only limited investment in flood infrastructure, inappropriately implemented, which has exacerbated tensions between stakeholders in the basin. Genesis was contracted to undertake an estimation of these costs and benefits where demonstrable.

Our team was instrumental in designing the economic model and in carrying out an appraisal of the project. We demonstrated how previous infrastructure, sponsored by the companies, caused additional costs elsewhere in the basin through displacement of water. The project established the economic rationale of flood infrastructure planning at a sub-basin level rather than individually, which essentially demonstrated that co-ordinated investment would lead to tangible benefits to both companies involved, as well as to small-scale farmers and vulnerable communities.

For more information on the project

TOP PHOTOGRAPH: The site on the lower Incomati that floods frequently and has been the focus of one of the project's flood mitigation strategies.

Plan for safe water in 12 Zambian border towns

Project name:
12 Border Towns Project

Service:
Project appraisal

Sector:
Water
Climate change
Infrastructure
Public and social

Client:
A DFID-funded facility managed by Adam Smith International

Date:
2014 - ongoing

Country:
Malawi
Zambia


Inadequate levels of water access and sanitation facilities can lead to the transmission of water-borne diseases across borders. This, in turn, stifles trade and other commercial and social activities within a sub-region and, at in extreme cases, can trigger cross-border conflict. 

The 12 Towns Project is an initiative aimed at providing a sustainable and equitable supply of safe water and appropriate sanitation to 12 border towns in Zambia, a country strategically and centrally located in the SADC region. Genesis was retained as the project economists for this suite of projects and carried out financial and economic appraisals for Kazungula, Chanida, Mwami, Chirundu and Siavonga border towns. Genesis provided recommendations of the appropriate allocation of the client's resources for the implementation for these projects.

By carrying out our project appraisal process, both the financial and economic justification of the separate projects was investigated. The particular focus of this project appraisal was in the project’s ability to provide climate-resilient infrastructure for the most vulnerable members of the border towns – with a particular focus on women and children. It also emphasised the project's ability to prevent transboundary conflict through better provisioning of infrastructure services. Input from our team resulted in the redesign of some of the projects to optimise their value for money and social impact in these strategic transboundary towns.

For more project information

TOP PHOTOGRAPH: Small traders at the Chirundu One-Stop Border Post. ABOVE: Trucks line up at the Chirundu One-Stop Border Post between Zambia and Zimbabwe

Securing water for Botswana

Project name:
Reconnaissance Study for the Chobe-Zambezi Water Transfer Scheme

Service:
Project appraisal

Sector:
Infrastructure
Climate change
Public and social
Water

Client:
Botswanan Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources

Date:
2016 - ongoing

Country:
Botswana


The Chobe-Zambezi water transfer project assesses the viability and costs of constructing a scheme that will transfer additional water from the Chobe and Zambezi rivers on the northern border of Botswana to the large demand centres in south-eastern Botswana.

It is estimated that by 2025, water supply in Botswana will be inadequate to meet demand. This shortfall will be further exacerbated by the impact of climate change on drought cycles in Botswana.

Genesis is the lead for the financial work stream for the project. The scope of work includes a reconnaissance of work that has already been undertaken in pre-feasibility stage, financial modelling for the detailed costing of the project, transaction and project structuring as well as the development of a procurement strategy.

Meet the Team

Projects

Project

SADC water and infrastructure projects

Genesis works with the Climate Resilient Infrastructure Development Facility (CRIDF), a DFID-funded facility that prepares water and infrastructure projects across SADC, in the design and delivery of water infrastructure that fosters sustainable development of the region’s water, food and energy security.

View Project
Project

Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme

The Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme (CSAP), funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), works to facilitate transformative change to the systems in which smallholder farmers operate in order to improve their livelihoods within the context of climate variability and change.

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Leading the team

Manyewu Mutamba

Senior Specialist

Manyewu Mutamba
Senior Specialist
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Kim Adonis

Manager

Kim Adonis
Manager
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​Amelia Midgley

Associate

​Amelia Midgley
Associate
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