Agriculture and Agribusiness

Africa’s agricultural sector is critical to sustainable economic growth and poverty alleviation. Unlocking the sector’s potential requires a combination of political will, enabling regulatory frameworks, improved access to finance, skills investment and climate change adaptation. An understanding of these interlocking factors underpins our approach to programme design and implementation.

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Expertise Areas

Market systems development

Undertaking practical and useful results measurement for programmes applying a market systems development approach is complex and requires one to think outside of the traditional linear approach to achieving impact.  

We combine our understanding of market systems, catalytic funding mechanisms and experience in private sector development with deep knowledge and expertise in international M&E standards, including the Donor Committee for Enterprise Development Standard.

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Monitoring and evaluation

Undertaking practical and useful results measurement for programmes applying a market systems development approach is complex and requires one to think outside of the traditional linear approach to achieving impact.  

We combine our understanding of market systems, catalytic funding mechanisms and experience in private sector development with deep knowledge and expertise in international M&E standards, including the Donor Committee for Enterprise Development Standard.

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Rural and agricultural finance

Smallholder and emerging commercial farmers represent a significant share of African agricultural production. However, limited access to finance traps these farmers in low input-low output production models. To bridge the access to finance gap, we work with financial service providers to develop products and services that profitably address farmers’ finance needs and with farmers to better prepare them to access finance.

Competition economics

As the leading provider of competition economics services in Africa, Genesis Analytics has an unmatched breadth and depth of skills and experience. Blue-chip companies across Africa routinely rely on us for expert advice and support when they interact with competition authorities. We also work extensively with regulators and competition authorities, giving us a position of trust based on a strong reputation for providing robust and independent expert economic views.

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Trade

We offer the full spectrum of expert economic support and advice in litigated and contested processes. Our diverse litigation experience enables us to provide rigorous and legally defendable analysis, advice and testimony for clients in a variety of legal processes, including damages, international trade disputes, and other arbitration and High Court proceedings.

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Projects

Case for private sector, climate-smart smallholder farming

Project name:
Business case for engaging the Private Sector in Climate Smart Solutions for smallholder farmers

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Climate Change

Area of Expertise:
Making markets work for the poor (M4P) in agriculture

Client:
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA)

Date:
2016

Country:
Malawi
Mozambique
South Africa
Zambia
Zimbabwe


Genesis was engaged by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) to research a business case for engaging the private sector in designing and delivering climate-smart solutions.  

The research was to inform the design and implementation of the CTA’s new flagship project on climate change, Promoting Climate-Resilient Agrifood Solutions for Cereals and Livestock Farmers in Southern Africa. 

The project aims to scale up four proven climate-resilient agrifood solutions (CRS) to increase food security, nutrition and income for smallholder farm households under changing climate conditions. It identified successful agribusiness models for private-sector engagement in the four CRS. Implementation will focus on Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The findings presented compelling evidence of win-win outcomes from private-sector investments that unlocked access to technology (e.g. drought-tolerant seed varieties and livestock breeds), finance, markets, information, insurance and other risk-management tools that build resilience of smallholder farmers. 

By helping farmers increase productivity, stabilise yields, improve quality, reduce production costs and transfer risk (through insurance), such investments are helping businesses stabilise supply (or demand in the case of suppliers), increase trade volumes and capacity use, access better products, lower transaction costs and minimise contractual defaults while building trust and a better understanding of the smallholder context. Governments and aid agencies also benefit from reduced need for safety nets and disaster recovery costs. Such partnerships create new commercial opportunities for service providers.         

Following our report and presentation at the programme’s regional conference in May 2016, the CTA and its partners resolved that their interventions would be anchored in inclusive private private-sector partnerships with farmers on a sustainable basis for deliver climate-smart solutions. 

One of CTA’s implementing partners in this project, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), is discussing long-term cooperation (beyond the current CTA-funded project) with Genesis to support the design and implementation of climate-smart solutions anchored in private-sector/farmer partnerships.

The implementation of CTA’s flagship project is expected to start some time this year. It is expected to incorporate significant elements from our research. This should result in more sustainable climate-smart solutions that unlock value for farmers, agribusinesses, governments, the development community and service providers. 

Plan to create 45 000 jobs in Ethiopia

Project name:
Plan to create 45 000 jobs in Ethiopia

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
Making markets work for the poor (M4P) in agriculture

Client:
A DFID programme managed by DAI Europe

Date:
2014 – ongoing

Country:
Ethiopia


Ethiopia has witnessed rapid economic growth with real gross domestic product (GDP) growth averaging 10.9% between 2004 and 2014. Enterprise Partners (EP) – an M4P programme managed by DAI Europe – aims to bolster this economic growth over the next six years through integrating the poor, especially women, in sustainable economic enterprises that create jobs and improve incomes.

The programme aims to create 45 000 jobs (75% of which will be held by women) and increase the incomes of 65 000 households by at least 20% through two interrelated strategies of increasing levels of investment in growth-oriented small and medium enterprises, and increasing returns on investment (productivity) in the cotton/textiles, livestock/leather and horticulture sectors.Central to the programme achieving its objectives is increased private sector investment. 

To increase private sector investment in agriculture, the Genesis-led agro-industrial component identified that the need for a flexible and contextually appropriate approach to private sector engagement and deal structuring. This resulted in the agro-industrial implementation team adopting a more deliberate, strategic and flexible approach that enabled the development incentives that better aligned the private sector with the programme’s objectives. 

For example, in the horticulture sector, EP seeks to improve linkages between local farmers and export markets through enabling an existing market actor to deliver export facilitation services to farmers.  Genesis used its market systems analysis to develop a locally appropriate model. The model identified the Ethiopian Horticultural Exporters and Producers Association (EHEPA) and existing commercial farmers as key pilot partners, outlining the facilitation efforts required to restructure the EHEPA operations, to support commercial farmers to individually export as well as provide export facilitation services to other farmers.  

This more deliberate focus on private sector led interventions with a clear exit strategy from the onset of implementation will yield systemic and sustainable changes in EP’s target agricultural value chains, ultimately underpinning the programme’s ability to reach its objectives of supporting Ethiopia’s increased pro-poor and inclusive growth.

The project plans to increase the land under horticultural production from 12 000ha to 20 000ha and exports sales from USD56-million to USD100-million.

Enterprise Partners and Ethiopian horticulture producers sign partnership agreement to create 3000 jobs

EP EHPEA Partnership Agreement Story Covered by FanaBC on 010716

Access to finance for 12 000 small-scale farmers

Project name:
Development of Value Chain Finance Products

Service:
Strategy
Financial inclusion
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Financial Services

Area of Expertise:
Rural and agricultural finance

Client:
Zimbabwe Agricultural Development Trust

Date:
2015 ongoing

Country:
Zimbabwe


The Zimbabwe Agricultural Development Trust (ZADT) aims to address the challenge of small-scale farmers who often struggle to access finance for agricultural production, locking the farmers into low input- low output production models. 

Small-scale farming is the backbone of the rural livelihoods in Zimbabwe. However, small-scale farmers often struggle to access finance for agricultural production, locking farmers into low input- low output production models. 

The ZADT aims by to achieve this by supporting financial institutions to lend into the smallholder agricultural sector. In pursuit of this aim, ZADT established the Credit for Agricultural Trade and Expansion (CREATE) fund, a revolving fund accessed by value chain actors through financial institutions. The fund provides working capital to input suppliers and off-takers whose activities ultimately benefit smallholder farmers.

In an effort to increase the fund’s impact, ZADT contracted Genesis to develop and pilot financial products suitable for direct access by smallholders.  To ensure the design of suitable products, Genesis adopted a two-phase approach. In Phase 1, we conducted a value chain analysis of the smallholder agricultural sector. 

Two key insights emerged from the analysis. Firstly, it led to the selection of the mung bean and sesame value chains for product development and testing. Secondly, it identified the financing needs of smallholders in those value chains. Building on the second insight, in Phase 2 we focused on designing a financial product that would best meet sesame and mung bean farmers’ identified financing needs.

Genesis proposed the development of a production credit facility to directly finance smallholder production. The facility will be piloted in the sesame and mung bean value chains, where an estimated 12 000 farmers are expected to access this new credit service of the CREATE Fund. 

Importantly, the new facility will support ZADT to directly finance smallholders, contributing to increased productivity, incomes and ultimately improved rural livelihoods.

Trade-related analysis on poultry imports from USA

Project name:
Trade-related analysis on poultry imports from USA

Service:
Trade

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Manufacturing

Client:
South African Poultry Association (SAPA)

Date:
2015

Country:
South Africa


Genesis has become an important source of independent analysis and advice to the South African Poultry Association (SAPA) and, through these engagements, also to decision-makers in South Africa’s International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC), the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) and the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF).

Over the past three years, we have helped ITAC to understand the potential impacts on domestic prices and consumers, and also on domestic poultry producers arising from SAPA’s tariff and anti-dumping applications against imported poultry products. Our work has also shaped and developed all stakeholders’ understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of the trade remedies available in South Africa’s Trade, Development and Co-operation Agreement (TDCA) with the European Union (EU).

In these various work streams, Genesis has modelled the transmission mechanism between higher tariffs, domestic prices and consumer welfare, as well as the average return on capital employed by domestic producers to be able to continue investing in their businesses. These analyses have generated a clearer understanding of the trade-offs between different types and levels of import protection. They have also assisted ITAC in its consideration of various objections raised by the importers and retailers who contested SAPA’s tariff and anti-dumping applications, many of which were speculative rather than evidence based.

Genesis also provided the dti with evidence-based analysis of the potential impacts of the USA’s decision to make South Africa’s continued inclusion in the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) contingent upon USA poultry producers gaining greater access to South Africa’s poultry market. This informed the dti’s negotiating strategy with representatives of the USA government, including the magnitude of the import quota eventually granted to USA producers. The objectives of this work required a thorough investigation of existing general equilibrium models to show the impacts on South African poultry producers and consumers of allowing USA poultry imports into the domestic market, as well as a rigorous analysis of the nature and extent of the potential harm to South African exports to the USA should AGOA preferences be revoked.

Genesis continues to provide economic advisory to SAPA on an ongoing basis. More recently, our team has been involved in assisting SAPA and the DAFF understand the impact of proposed brining regulations on domestic poultry producers and consumers.

Cases show way for climate-smart farming in Zimbabwe

Project name:
Documenting cases of Climate Smart Agriculture in Zimbabwe

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Climate Change

Client:
VUNA/Government of Zimbabwe

Date:
2017

Country:
Zimbabwe


Seven successful cases of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) in Zimbabwe, documented by Genesis, are to be included in a manual being written for the country’s eight agricultural colleges.

Genesis was contracted by VUNA, a regional DFID-funded programme on CSA to document these cases. 

CSA is foremost among the approaches in the agricultural sector to tackle the threats from a changing climate and a number of Zimbabwean governmental and non-governmental entities have adopted it as their main approach to tackling climate change. 

This project was intended to improve the understanding of this concept by documenting practical examples of its application in Zimbabwe, particularly among smallholder farmers. 

Genesis has also assisted the Department of Agriculture in Zimbabwe on the process of establishing a unit dedicated to climate change. It is expected to be launched in early 2018.

Full Report

Phiri Junior, a farmer in Zvishavane, describes the benefits of water harvesting

Phiri Junior, a farmer in Zvishavane, describes the benefits of water harvesting

The seven detailed case studies from six provinces were documented, showcasing CSA practices such as conservation agriculture, solar-powered drip irrigation, low-cost aquaculture, production and preservation of supplementary fodder for livestock, local crop variety testing, and integrated renewable energy (biogas, solar) in crop/livestock systems. 

Following a presentation of these studies to key officials in the ministries of Agriculture and of Environment, Water and Climate, a decision was taken to integrate the cases into a Climate Smart Agriculture Manual for use in Zimbabwe’s eight agricultural colleges. 

In these cases key technical elements of these interventions were described, including farmers’ sentiments of their suitability to smallholder systems as well as their impact on productivity, incomes and climate resilience. Each case study was also analysed for its ‘climate smartness’ in line with the three CSA pillars: sustainable increase in productivity and incomes; greater resilience and adaptive capacity; and contribution to reducing emission of greenhouse gases (mitigation). The ‘scalability’ and sustainability of each intervention was assessed to determine potential for wider application and impact on people’s livelihoods. 

The seven cases that were documented: 1. Solar-powered drip irrigation: Zinkondweni irrigation scheme 2. Rain-water harvesting: The story of Mr Zephaniah Phiri Maseko 3. Conservation agriculture: A widow’s success story 4. Transformational adaptation: From crops to fish farming 5. Fodder production and preservation for livestock feeding: Guyu fodder project 6. A systems approach to CSA: Integrating renewable energy into crop/livestock systems 7. Towards a Climate Smart Village: Hezekiah Village, Gokwe North District.

Top photo: Mr Makwala, a farmer in Guyu Communal areas, shows off some of his fodder crop

Raising incomes by 50% in Niger Delta

Project name:
Raising incomes by 50% in Niger Delta

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
Programme design, implementation and management
Making markets work for the poor (M4P) in agriculture

Client:
A DFID programme managed by DAI Europe

Date:
2014 – ongoing

Country:
Nigeria


The Niger Delta is Nigeria’s second poorest region where the concentration of oil industries has created wage and commodities inflation, raising the cost of living and intensifying poverty among the poor.  The high levels and intensity of poverty and inequality have fuelled militancy and eruptions of violence, further aggravating and perpetuating the incidence of poverty.  

This programme seeks to address this challenge by applying an M4P approach to design and implement systemic and sustainable interventions. The market development (MADE) programme aims to help generate pro-poor and inclusive economic growth in the non-oil sectors of the nine Niger Delta states by raising the incomes of at least 150 000 people – 50% of whom are women – by 50%.

The role of Genesis has been to provide market systems development advisory services to the MADE technical team. In the design phase, this entailed conducting market systems analysis in the agricultural inputs value chain and overseeing analysis in the cassava, fisheries, household poultry, and palm oil value chains. 

The analysis conducted underpinned the MADE business case, which once approved by DFID, ensured the programme’s transition to the implementation phase. In the Implementation phase, we continue to provide advisory services, ensuring success by contributing to the design, implementation and management of pro-poor, private sector led interventions. 

With the support of the Genesis team, MADE’s private sector led interventions across the agricultural inputs, palm oil, fisheries (wild capture and aquaculture), cassava and household poultry value chains have reached 73% of the targeted Year 2 outreach of 35 434. There was also evidence of income gains being realised in value chains with short production cycles, such as aquaculture as well as crowding-in of additional private sector players. 

Analysis of additional protective measures for SA Sugar Association

Project name:
Analysis of additional protective measures for the South African Sugar Association

Service:
Trade

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness

Client:
South African Sugar Association (SASA)

Date:
2013

Country:
South Africa


The South African Sugar Association (SASA) asked Genesis to assist by examining a concern expressed by the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) that SASA’s application for increased protection against imported sugar would harm consumers.

Answering this question required us to analyse the nature and effect of laws and regulations that underpin a complex price-setting process in the domestic sugar industry, and in particular the extent to which domestic prices respond to increases in import prices. This provided the foundation for estimating the maximum possible increase in domestic producer prices in the event that ITAC approved SASA’s application. This in turn also allowed an estimation of potential consumer impacts, which arise through direct sugar purchases and through purchases of manufactured products containing sugar.

Using information from StatsSA Genesis provided critical insights to ITAC which ultimately provided comfort that the granting of SASA’s application would not generate significant consumer harm and would at the same time protect an industry that generates significant investment and employment opportunities in South Africa’s rural areas.

Helping innovation for Africa’s rural farm families

Project name:
Helping to innovate a new sector of microfinance for Africa’s rural farm families

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation
Financial inclusion

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Financial Services

Area of Expertise:
Evaluation & impact assessment

Client:
A MasterCard Foundation programme managed by One Acre Fund

Date:
2015 - 2016

Country:
Burundi
Kenya
Rwanda


Despite the economic significance of agriculture in East Africa, smallholder farmers in the region are extremely poor. Many produce only enough food for their families. 

These smallholder farmers' low productivity is exacerbated by a lack of access to quality inputs, financing and efficient farming techniques.

The One Acre Fund was established to extend financing, technical support and other services to smallholder farmers. In 2013, the MasterCard Foundation provided a grant to the One Acre Fund to expand its reach in Kenya, Rwanda and Burundi, and to strengthen its core systems and become a knowledge disseminator. In 2016, One Acre Fund and the MasterCard Foundation engaged Genesis to conduct the mid-term evaluation of this grant.

The evaluation used a mixed-methods, participatory and iterative approach. This included a review and synopsis of key documentation, interviews with stakeholders in rural agriculture financing (RAF), field observations and focus group discussions (FGDs) with existing, previous, and non-One Acre Fund farmers. 

As part of these FGDs, the evaluation team made use of a pocket voting participatory approach to elicit more honest reactions to questions on the constraints facing the farmers, as well as what they found to be the most useful component of One Acre Fund’s package. The evaluation provided insights to inform strategic decisions for the organisation, as well as to inform future efforts in the broader RAF sector. 

Genesis also put forward recommendations to the One Acre Fund to consider for the rest of the grant term and beyond to maximise its impact.

TOP: One Acre Fund testing different post-harvest processing methods

Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme

Project name:
Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Climate Change
Agriculture and Agribusiness

Client:
A DFID programme managed by Adam Smith International

Date:
2015 – ongoing

Country:
Malawi
Mozambique
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe


The Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme (CSAP), funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), works to facilitate transformative change to the systems in which smallholder farmers operate in order to improve their livelihoods within the context of climate variability and change.

CSAP works across East and Southern Africa – initially in Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe – to increase the climate resilience of smallholder farmers by using targeted evidence, developing approaches for the uptake of sustainable and locally suited agricultural practices, and improving the wider enabling environment.

Climate-smart agriculture training

Climate-smart agriculture training

Genesis provides support for the programme’s agricultural development component. This seeks to pilot and, where appropriate, scale up ways of delivering information and services related to climate-smart agricultural practices that are tailored to the specific circumstances in which smallholder farmers operate.

Applying mulching and composting learnings

Applying mulching and composting learnings

In support of this component, the Genesis-appointed Zimbabwe country representative oversaw a rapid market systems analysis of key Zimbabwean agricultural value chains, including maize, sorghum, cotton, wheat, groundnuts and barley. 

The key objective of the analysis was to identify and present potential private-sector-driven projects that promote climate-smart agricultural practices among smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe to the CSAP regional programme team in order to assess funding requirements.

Redesign of Agriculture Technical Assistance Fund

Project name:
Review and re-design of the African Agriculture Fund's Technical Assistance Facility's Monitoring and Evaluation System

Service:
Monitoring and evaluation

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness

Client:
TechnoServe, Inc.

Date:
2014 - ongoing

Country:
Cameroon
Ethiopia
Madagascar
Malawi
Sierra Leone
Zambia
Zimbabwe


The Technical Assistance Facility (TAF) was set up to support the African Agricultural Fund (AAF) improve food security in Africa through more inclusive value chains and greater food production.

In 2014, Genesis was contracted by TechnoServe, Inc. to establish good practice and international M&E frameworks, using guidelines and standards from the EU, IFAD, UK DFID, FAO and DCED. 

The outcome of this research was used to review TAF’s M&E framework to bring it into line with international standards, improve its comprehensiveness and maximise its utility. This project was conducted in a consultative manner that ensured greater ownership and commitment to the use of the M&E system within TAF and its projects, taking into consideration the capacity and feasibility of M&E tasks at the project level.

Genesis has been retained by TAF to provide on-going support in the implementation of the system, as well as assisting in the M&E training of its grantees.

Bringing a chicken project home to roost

Project name:
Social impact strategy for the PIC on large poultry transaction

Service:
Shared value

Sector:
Public and Social
Agriculture and Agribusiness

Area of Expertise:
Shared value and inclusive business strategy

Client:
Large BEE consortium

Date:
2014

Country:
South Africa


A BEE consortium had approached the PIC, the largest asset manager in Africa, to partly fund the purchase of a large poultry company.

The PIC, in line with its developmental investment strategy, wanted to ensure that the social value of the transaction was maximised. Genesis was asked to produce a social impact strategy for the transaction. 

The transaction was concluded on the basis of the independent advice provided by Genesis and the social strategy was imposed as a condition of funding. 

The approach will grow emerging farmers upstream while creating business for township distributors and spaza shops downstream.

Daybreak eyes poultry sales model in townships

Developing market links for smallholder farmers

Project name:
Developing linkages for smallholder farmers

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
Value chain analysis (VCA)
Programme design, implementation and management

Client:
Cardno Emerging Markets (UK)

Date:
2015 – 2017

Country:
South Africa


In South Africa, smallholder farmers remain locked out of formal retail markets due to the markets’ stringent quality and volume requirements, particularly for fresh fruit and vegetables. 

The TGVCI Farmer Support and Linkages project was an 18-month programme that addressed this constraint by linking smallholder farmers to established retail markets through emerging commercial farming hubs that acted as collection, standardisation and distribution points of product, as well as a source of inputs, market information, technical advice and training.

Through linking smallholder farmers to established retail markets, the programme increased the economic and social wellbeing of smallholder farmers producing fruit and vegetables in the Gauteng and North West provinces of South Africa.

Genesis adopted a private-sector-led development approach to inform programme implementation by working with market actors to present and facilitate the adoption of new practices (business models, services, behaviours) that resulted in more inclusive supply chains.

Genesis’s facilitation efforts targeted input suppliers, commercial farming hubs, smallholders and retailers whereby the hub procurement model and its integrated commercial benefits to each market actor were presented and promoted for adoption.

Our facilitation efforts resulted in retail off-takers engaging with hubs in an effort to develop long-term procurement relationships. Hubs initiating or consolidating relationships with smallholder farmers. As well as input suppliers proposing models to provide high quality technical advice on crop selection and production to participating farmers. 

All of this will continue to underpin the production, consolidation and sale of high quality produce from smallholders to participating private sector off-takers via the commercial farming hubs.

Working models for inclusive agricultural business

Project name:
Study on Inclusive Business Models in South African Agricultural Value Chains

Service:
Market systems development

Sector:
Agriculture and Agribusiness
Public and Social

Area of Expertise:
Value chain analysis (VCA)

Client:
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

Date:
2015

Country:
South Africa


Inclusive business models that integrate previously disadvantaged individuals into agricultural value chains in a commercially viable way have mixed success in South Africa. 

Determining what works is critical in informing model refinement, replication and scaling up for international donor organisation Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) . They would like to adopt a facilitation role in supporting successful IBMs (inclusive business models).

In this assignment, we applied our experience in value chain analysis to determine which South African agricultural value chains presented the highest potential inclusive business models for deeper analysis. The sunflower oil, potato and essential oil value chains were selected, and their inclusive business model design investigated to identify what type of facilitation efforts GIZ could adopt to support model replication and scaling. 

Across the value chains, the recommendations focused on strengthening the commercial viability of the model through improving smallholder farmers’ productivity. In sunflower oil, this requires strengthening the model’s training and mentoring component. The potato IBM required more stringent smallholder farmer selection criteria and a technical and mechanical assistance facility. While in essential oils, farm-level distillation technology and skills transfers should be explored. 

For GIZ, critical to success will be capacitating firms to ensure that productivity upgrading remains intrinsic to the inclusive business model. 

Meet the Team

Areas of Service Expertise

  • Market systems development
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Rural and agricultural finance
  • Competition economics
  • Trade

Related Sectors

Projects

Project

Case for private sector, climate-smart smallholder farming

Genesis was engaged by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) to research a business case for engaging the private sector in designing and delivering climate-smart solutions.  

View Project
Project

Plan to create 45 000 jobs in Ethiopia

Ethiopia has witnessed rapid economic growth with real gross domestic product (GDP) growth averaging 10.9% between 2004 and 2014. Enterprise Partners employed Genesis to provide techical support in their programme to further bolster growth over the next six years through integrating the poor, especially women, in sustainable economic enterprises that create jobs and improve incomes.

View Project

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Leading the team

Sydney Zharare

Partner (Agribusiness and Market Development)

Sydney Zharare
Partner (Agribusiness and Market Development)
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Nokuzola Jenness

Manager

Nokuzola Jenness
Manager
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​Alyna Wyatt

Partner (Evaluation for Development)

​Alyna Wyatt
Partner (Evaluation for Development)
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James Hodge

Director and Managing Partner (Competition and Regulatory Economics)

James Hodge
Director and Managing Partner (Competition and Regulatory Economics)
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